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Posts Tagged ‘The Bakery Network’


Have you ever had to purchase casters for your new or used bakery equipment?

44 You might have found it confusing because there are many elements to consider when buying the right casters for your equipment. Price, size, type and so on. As well, would there be a negative impact on your equipment if you purchase the wrong casters? And remember, “you get what you pay for”, so cheaper doesn’t always mean better.

WHAT ARE CASTERS USED ON?
Baking oven racks, proof racks, storage racks, bakery dough troughs, griddles, and other high temperature bakery applications.

MAINTENANCE TIPS FOR CASTERS:

  • Keep your casters and equipment clean.
  • Check for food and debris on a regular basis for optimum productivity.
  • Look beyond the wheel and inspect the nuts, bolts and other parts inside for wear and tear or to remove excess matter.
  • Encourage your bakery team to keep a cleaning and maintenance schedule. 47 Check your wheels – When using polyurethane wheels, poor maintenance will lead to the material becoming embedded in the wheel while causing damage of the wheel tread. Not only will your casters suffer, but your bakery equipment and floors could suffer as well. Tighten up your bolts and keep your parts well lubricated as instructed. If damaged, you should look to replace your casters and wheels as soon as possible. Contact Horizon’s Parts Department for replacement casters and wheels.

COSTS AND IMPLICATIONS OF BAD CASTERS:
There are several negative issues that can arise if you purchase bad casters. Kiss the money you saved up-front goodbye. Your bakery equipment, business and employees will suffer if you purchase bad casters. Bakery racks that bounce across a hard floor on rough wheels tend to crumble. Choosing too soft of a wheel can also limit your equipment load. Use the proper lubrication for right application. High-temp grease for your oven racks and food-grade grease for your transport racks will protect your equipment and floors. Your employees’ safety is first. Prevent injuries by enforcing regular and proper maintenance.  If your equipment parts are maintained on a regular basis and not mistreated, you will get the maximum safety and service performance from your casters.46

Always observe the following rules:

  • Never overload the equipment.
  • Never drop heavy loads on the equipment.
  • Never subject the equipment to operation at high speeds.
  • Swivel casters turn more easily under load, reducing starting effort and fatigue, and allow a more consistent level of output.

FLOOR CONDITIONS:
Floors are expensive to repair or replace. Poor casters damage floors and poor floors damage casters, reduce productivity, and are hazardous in your bakery business. Are your transport cabinets and bakery racks leaving nasty tracks on your vinyl tile floor? Is the surface of your casters starting to wear, leaving nasty track marks? Assess your floors and check your casters to make sure you have a good match.

MAINTENANCE FOR OVENS:
In the December article of The Bakery Network Knead2Know newsletter, “Bringing the Heat”, the focus was on ovens and even calibrating your oven. We would like to dig deeper and give you some additional preventative maintenance tips to keep your oven running for many years to come.

Burner Adjustment: Clean and take apart the burner as it usually gets filled with flour or dust. Checking the gas pressure is also important. If there is not enough gas, it will take too long to bake. If there is too much gas (your flame will be a yellow in color), that creates soot; soot causes cracking.

Temperature Calibration: Check your bakery oven temperature on a regular basis. Communicate with your staff as your bakers might be used to baking at a certain temperature. Your bread which used to bake perfectly at 380° might now be too done if your bakers are not aware of the recent calibration!

Heat Exchanger Inspection: Check for defects, cracks plugged ports or any other signs that the integrity of the heat exchanger has been compromised. If damaged, this causes your bakery oven to be inefficient, wastes energy and is unsafe for employees.


42 Horizon Equipment has a great team of service and parts specialists ready and willing to help you choose the proper caster for your bakery equipment. We make it easy by providing maintenance tips to optimize the performance of your equipment to keep your bakery business running.

For more information on choosing the correct caster, check out our Choosing the Proper Caster documentation on our website or visit www.horizonequipment.com.

Save 15% when you mention promo code CASTERS2012 on your next caster order before March 21, 2012.

Need assistance with Service and Parts? Visit Horizon’s Service and Parts Department page for friendly professional support or call us at (800) 394-4674.

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 FRENCH PASTRY is a specialty pastry product that tests the ability of the pastry baker. On the other hand, cream puffs and Eclairs are delicious desserts which are not difficult to make if directions are followed carefully.

FRENCH PASTRYis made from a vert rich dough containing a large amount of butter or maragarine sometimes combined with a special puff pastry shortening. A cream puff is a round hollow shell made from a paste consisting of water, shortening, butter or maragarine, salt, flour and eggs. At the end of the recipes, step by step demonstrations will be given on producing these specialty pastries.

FRENCH PASTRY DOUGH RECIPE:

Ingredients Pounds Ounces
Flour, Bread

4

0

salt

0

1

Puff Pastry Shortening

4

0

Water, Ice-cold

2

4

MIXING METHOD ONE: Add all the ingredients of the recipe except the (Puff Pastry Shortening) in the mixing bowl. Mix the dough until the gluten is fully developed using the Dough Hook. Place the mixed dough on work bench which has been dusted with flour. Shape the dough into an oblong shape about 12 inches wide and 20 inches long. Spot the Puff Paste Shortening on two thirds of the dough as is demonstrated in PART SEVEN – DEMONSTRATION DANISH PASTRY.

Fold and roll the dough just as you would a Danish Pastry Dough being careful not to break through the dough by using excessive pressure on the rolling pin. Refrigerate for about 30 minutes between rolls to Let the dough relax. Cover the rolled dough with a damp cloth to keep a crust from forming. Repeat the rolling process 3 times. After the final roll, and after the dough has been refrigerated for an additional 30 minutes or overnight, it is ready to be made up into a variety of French Pastries, some of which are demonstrated below.

MIXING METHOD TWO: Place the flour, the Puff Pastry Shortening and salt into the mixing bowl. Work the fat into the dough either by hand or with the mixing paddle just as you would for mixing a pie dough. Mix only long enough so that the flour is only partially covered with fat leaving lumps of fat about the size of marbles. Add water to the partially coated flour and mix only long enough to form a dough. ( Do not overmix ). Place dough on a flour coated work bench. Place the mixed dough on work bench which has been dusted with flour. Shape the dough into an oblong shape about 12 inches wide and 20 inches long and roll it into an oblong shape about 1/2 inch thick, being careful not to break through the dough by using excessive pressure on the rolling pin. Lap dough to form three folds. Let dough relax for about 30 minutes, covering it with a damp cloth to keep a crust from forming.

Repeat this step three or four times, brushing flour off dough each time, and being careful not to damage the dough with too much pressure on the rolling pin. Refrigerate for about 30 minutes or overnigh. Make-up the various items such as Cream Horns and Patty Shells demonstrated below. Many other varieties such as Palm Leaves can also be made.

NOTE: Cream horns can be filled with a marshmallow type meringue or any type of filling desired. Patty shells can be filled with a Shrimp Newburg type filling, Chicken a-la King or any other type filling.

MAKING CREAM HORNS FROM FRENCH PASTRY

  • ROLL THE FINISHED FRENCH PASTRY DOUGH ABOUT 12 INCHES WIDE AND 1/8TH INCH THICK. CUT INTO STRIPS ABOUT ONE INCH WIDE. • WASH DOUGH STRIPS WITH LIGHT COATING OF WATER OR EGG WASH.
  • ROLL STRIP ONTO METAL OR PAPER CREAM HORNS STARTING AT SMALL END OF HORN. • COMPLETE ROLL BY OVERLAPPING STRIPS WHILE ROLLING ON CREAM HORN. MAKING PATTY SHELLS 
  • CUTTING THE DOUGH WHICH HAS BEEN ROLLED TO AN EVEN THICKNESS OF ABOUT 1/4TH TO 1/2 INCH THICK AND 15 INCHES WIDE WITH A SHARP CUTTER. 
  • USING SMALL SHARP CUTTER, MAKE SHELL BY CUTTING OUT CENTER TO FORM RING.
  • COMBINE CUT PORTIONS ( SCRAP DOUGH ) AND PRESS TOGETHER. ROLL THE SCRAP DOUGH ABOUT 1/8TH INCH THICK. DOCK ROLLED DOUGH FOR SHELL BOTTOM.
  • CUT DOCKED DOUGH WITH SAME CUTTER USED TO CUT RINGS.
  • AFTER TRIMMINGS ARE REMOVED, WASH THE DOCKED BOTTOMS A FEW AT A TIME WITH A LIGHT COATING OFWATER OR EGG WASH SO THE RINGS WILL STICK TO THE BOTTOMS.
  • PLACE RINGS ON BOTTOM PIECES TAKING CARE TO MATCH EDGES EVENLY

1. Baked cream horns
2. Baked patty shells

CREAM PUFF AND ECLAIR RECIPE:

Ingredients Pounds Ounces
Water

5

4

Butter or Margarine

2

0

Combine water and fat together and bring to rolling boil making sure the fat has melted completely.

Ingredients Pounds Ounces
Flour, Bread

3

0

 

Add flour to boiling mixture stirring constantly until cooked into a thick paste. Remove from heat.

Ingredients Pounds Ounces
eggs, whole

5

4

salt

0

1

Place cooked mixture into mixing bowl and mix a few turns with the mixing paddle to cool the mixture slightly. Add the salt to the eggs. Add eggs and salt mixture slowly while mixing and mix to a smooth batter.

NOTE: The amount of eggs varies so it may be necessary hold back on a small amount of eggs or the eggs may have to be increased slightly to obtain a smooth batter. Drop on lightly greased pans which have been dusted with flour. Bake at 400 degrees F. for about 30 minutes. Reduce heat to 300 degrees F. to dry out the inside of the Puffs and Eclairs to keep them from falling. When Bread Flour is used in the recipe as is the case with this recipe, the top of the baked product will crack somewhat. If a smooth top and a more tender product is desired, then Cake Flour can be used.

CREAM FILLING FOR CREAM PUFFS AND ECLAIRS:

Ingredients Pounds Ounces
water

1

8

sugar

1

8

Bring water and sugar to a boil.

Ingredients Pounds Ounces
water

1

8

sugar

1

8

Suspend starch in water and add to boiling mixture while stirring vigorously with hand whip. Cook until thick and clear. Remove from heat.

Ingredients Pounds Ounces
Sugar granulated

0

12

salt

0

1/4th

milk, nonfat dry

0

6-1/2

Butter or margarine

0

4

Add sugar, salt,dry milk and butter or margarine to cooked mixture and stir until dry ingredients are dissolved and butter or margarine is melted.

Ingredients Pounds Ounces
Eggs

1

4

 

Beat the eggs slightly with a hand whip. Pour 1/4th of cooked mixture over eggs and stir vigorously. NOTE: Reason for pouring part of the egg over eggs is to prevent the eggs from coagulating too soon which would result in a lumpy mixture.

Ingredients Pounds Ounces
Vanilla

0

1/2

salt

0

1/4th

Add vanilla to cooked mixture and stir. At this point if a shiffon type cream is desired, a small amount of meringue can be folded into the cooked mixture while still hot. Refrigerate until ready to be used.

MAKING CREAM PUFFS AND ECLAIRS:

  • PANNING CREAM PUFF BATTER BY HAND
  • PANNING ECLAIR BATTER USING PASTRY BAG
  •  FILLING CREAM PUFFS AND ECLAIRS WITH MACHINE

 1. FILLED CREAM PUFFS TOPPED WITH CHOCOLATE ICING AND POWDERED SUGAR
2. FILLED ECLAIRS TOPPED WITH CHOCOLATE ICING AND POWDERED SUGAR

 This completes part eight on French Pastries and Cream Puffs-Eclairs. Thanks again to Willie Prejean for proving all the information on this blog.

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Here is Part 3 in our continuing Baking and Baking Science education…thanks to Willie Prejean.

INTRODUCTION
There has been a great deal of progress in the methods used to construct bread formulas. Many years ago bread formulas were expressed in Pail, Bucket or Gallon. Today, formulas are expressed in percentages and is referred to as Baker’s Percentage Method…the formula is then converted to pounds and ounces.
When expressing formulas in the percentage system, 100 pounds of flour always represents 100 percent. Percentages of all other ingredients are based on the flour. Although, this may seem confusing, it is a very accurate method which you can see using this method below.
The amount of ingredient necessary to produce a given amount of bread can be calculated right down to pounds and fractions of ounces. The following is an example of a white bread formula using the Baker’s Percentage Method.

Construction of a bread formula to determine pounds and ounces of each ingredient to use, to produce 500 pounds of bread.

Note: Dough losses weight by giving off gasses and moisture and by a small amount of dough that sticks to the mixer. This amount of loss averages about 2 percent. Dough also loses weight during the proofing, baking and cooling. This loss usually averages about 11 percent. These losses must be taken into consideration when constructing a bread formula — the total percentage loss equals13 percent.

The following example explains how to take the above losses into consideration when determining the exact weight of each ingredient to use in the formula to produce a certain amount of bread:

1. Pounds of bread required=500 pounds.
2. 100% = ( Total percentage of ingredients to use to produce500 pounds of bread ).
3. Total loss = 13 %.
a. 100% – 13% = 87% after loss. This is the net percentage of bread ( 500 ) that can be produced from 100% of ingredients.
b. To find how much 100% ingredients equals, it is necessary to divide 500 pounds of baked bread by 87%. This is referred to as the amount of dough required to produce 500 pounds of bread.

Note: Remember that when using percentages, you must move the decimal point two points to the left.

Example:
a. 500 pounds of bread required divided by .87= 574.71 pounds of ingredients to use in the formula.
b. 574.71 pounds of ingredients divided by the total formula percent ( 180% ) = 319.28 pounds of flour to use.

Since all ingredients in the formula are based on the flour, the percent of each ingredient is multiplied times the pounds of flour in the formula.
Converting the straight dough formula to a sponge-and-dough formula.

First the baker must decide what percentage of the flour in the straight dough formula will go into the sponge dough formula. This varies with the strength of the flour and with a flour having a relatively high protein content. Also if the protein is of very good quality, 75% of the formula flour would go into the sponge, and 25% would go into the dough. The amount varies depending on several factors, and through experience, the baker can determine what percentages produce the best results. Other percentage ratios can be used such as 60/40,70/30, etc. The baker’s percentage system of formula computation applies as well to the sponge and dough method as it does to the straight dough method.

Note: At this time it is a good idea to mention why water is always listed as variable in bread formulas. That is because no two flour’s have the same absorption quality — only experience will determine this. This usually changes each time a new shipment of flour is received.

Mixing the sponge.
Prepare the ingredients for the sponge in accordance with information contained in Part Two, Principles of Bread Production.

1. Temper the water.
2. Mix the sponge only about 3 or 4 minutes because full gluten development is not required at this time.
3. Have the sponge come out of the mixer at 76 degrees F. rather than 80 degrees F for the dough. Sponges ferment for several hours, therefore the temperature rise during fermentation will remain in the alcoholic fermentation range.

Note: When the sponge is returned to the mixer after it has gone through the fermentation stage. To be remixed with the dough ingredients, the dough must be mixed until the gluten has been fully developed (as explained in Part Two, Principles of Bread Production). The dough temperature should be about 80 degrees F when it comes out of the mixer.

This completes part three on Bread Formulas and Bread Formula Construction. Today people are demanding a variety in foods, part four- Variety Breads will help you to meet this demand.

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white wheat

I’m sure just the sound of that makes you wonder what genetically altered mad scientist came up with this idea. White is White, Whole Wheat is Whole Wheat, Rye is Rye and so on…

Brilliant, absolutely! Personally, the nuttier, the chewier and the closer to tree bark the better for me but for many, white bread is a staple. My kids love the idea and I’m sure that’s what all the huge bakeries around the world finally realized. Kids mean money…lots and lots money.

So is it nutritious or just a marketing ploy?
Regular white bread is made with refined grains — the process of refinement basically strips out certain parts of the grain. White whole-wheat bread on the other hand  — is made with the whole grain…just like whole wheat bread.

The difference between white whole-wheat bread and regular whole-wheat bread is in the type of wheat used. Red wheat is used for regular whole wheat bread whereas white whole-wheat bread is made from an albino wheat. This type of wheat is obviously lighter in color with a sweeter, milder flavor (which makes it “kid friendly”)

If whole grain is what you are after, just read the label. If whole grain is listed as the first ingredient, chances are you are getting a more nutritional product. If the first ingredient doesn’t have the word “whole” in it…it’s not whole grain.

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Is Chocolate Good For You – Is There any Nutrition Here?

Oh, don’t we all want the answer to be yes. Chocolate for breakfast, lunch and dinner and a cup of dark hot chocolate to wash it all down. Soooo, is there any evidence that eating chocolate offers nutritional benefits beyond that glowing warm feeling of satisfaction?

Drum roll please….drdrdrdrdrr….YES!  Well, maybe. While research is not conclusive, there seems to be growing evidence that chocolate and cocoa contain beneficial polyphenols, including the type called flavonoids. Polyphenol compounds act as antioxidants and protect the body from disease and the damage caused by free radicals. A 1.5-ounce chocolate bar contains about the same amount of total phenolic compounds as a 5-ounce glass of red wine. However, research also shows that the quality and quantity of antioxidants in chocolate is very high relative to red wine and other common items such as apples, oranges teas and vegetables. In addition, pure cocoa contains more than 30 organic compounds, including many beneficial minerals such as fluoride, potassium and magnesium. These minerals are important to good health since fluoride protects the bone structure supporting teeth, potassium contributes to a healthy nervous system and a regular heart rhythm, and magnesium is a vital catalyst in enzyme activity and energy production, and assists calcium and potassium absorption.

Say what??? Yes, we got a little heavy there but had to lay it out so that you can brag to people about how that piece of chocolate you are eating is good for you.

Other research seems to indicate that the antioxidants in real chocolate may play a role in heart health.  These antioxidants may also help increase “good” HDL cholesterol levels and protect against oxidation of LDL cholesterol, a process that normally leads to artery-clogging plaques. 

How about diabetes and chocolate? 
Good news! Eating chocolate is no longer frowned upon when it’s eaten in small amounts. The sugar in chocolate is absorbed slowly, giving the body more time to manage the rise in blood glucose. Chocolate eaten after a meal is preferable for diabetics since this also helps to slow the absorption of sugar.

While all of this research is great, they still need to calculate how much chocolate you need to consume to actually receive these benefits. Assuming we only need a little amount of chocolate everyday to enjoy the benefits, great! But what happens if future research shows that you need to munch on a pound of chocolate everyday to enjoy the health related benefits. Oh, it’s such an evil world we live in.

I say just like anything in life, enjoy in moderation.

Cheers, TBN

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Came across this article written by Devra Gartenstein over at ehow (http://www.ehow.com/how_6223494_run-bakery-business.html) and thought it had some great substance, soooo…if you haven’t read it, this is a nice quick read to get you back on track.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Running a successful bakery business involves developing routines and record-keeping systems that enable you to meet demand while producing only a minimal amount of extra inventory. In addition, a bakery must have a core group of recipes as well as efficient systems for producing and distributing goods. Display is important to the success of a bakery as well, because customers are more likely to buy baked goods if they are presented in an appealing way.

Step 1
Create a product line for your bakery. Your operation should have a primary focus such as breads or cookies, and it should also offer supplemental products that expand your niche and give customers a well-rounded selection. Develop recipes that are adaptable, and use similar enough processes and ingredients to provide some degree of consolidation and efficiency. However your product line should be varied enough for your customers to find it interesting. Offer seasonal menus and customized special-order items, such as birthday cakes.
Step 2
Develop an inventory system for storing and ordering ingredients. This can be a computerized system that integrates the amount of each ingredient that you use in daily production with your records for ordering inventory. Alternately, it can be a set of handwritten records tracking how much of each item you have on hand on a daily or weekly basis, and providing space for order information to supplement supplies on hand. Set up a storage system to keep flours and grains fresh and safe from rodents. Check invoices to stay abreast of price changes, and adjust the prices you charge to your customers accordingly.
Step 3
Set up an attractive display system for your bakery business. Use platters and baskets that show off your products, such as a long, tall basket for baguettes or a round platter for cinnamon buns. Create displays that appear bountiful, but don’t stock them with so much product that the items on the bottom will be crushed. Develop a system for rotating stock in your bakery displays so that you sell off older inventory before it grows stale.
Step 4
Train your bakery staff in baking and customer-service protocols. Develop kitchen routines delegating different baking and cleaning tasks to different positions. Post a cleaning schedule. Provide your service staff with detailed knowledge of your ingredients as well as serving suggestions. Teach your counter staff to pack items so they stay intact and fresh.
 
In summary, this is only touching the surface but the information is good stuff. I would add that while you are running your successful bakery, don’t forget to always present a consistent product and control your ingredients costs. These two factors will put money in your pocket and keep your customers returning.
Cheers, TBN

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Hey lover’s of chocolate…or maybe hater’s (don’t worry, we still like you). Today we’ll take a look at how chocolate is made.

First, let’s start off with the 5 main components:

  1. Cocoa Substance (cocoa liquor, cocoa butter, cocoa powder)
  2. Milk Substance (milk solids, milkfat whey)
  3. Sugar (sucrose, lactose)
  4. Emulsifier (usually lecithin)
  5. Flavouring ingredient (usually vanillin)

To produce such an addictive delight, there is a complex process that needs to be followed — First cocoa beans (typically imported as fermented and dried) are cleaned, then blended. Several varieties of beans may be combined to give the desired flavor. The beans are next roasted to develop their flavor and reduce moisture content to make it easy to remove their outer shells. After this step, only the nib or kernel of the cocoa bean remains, containing the essence of chocolate. The nib is ground to a paste and the liquid mass that emerges is called chocolate liquor. Grinding also releases the vegetable fat or cocoa butter from the nib. By law, the amount of cocoa butter in chocolate liquor can vary only between 50 to 58 percent. Cooled and hardened into blocks or bars, chocolate liquor becomes basic unsweetened chocolate. With further grinding, some chocolate liquor is used to make cocoa powder.

For regular, plain chocolate, chocolate liquor is mixed with powdered sugar. Cocoa butter is added to enhance the consistency and make a stiff paste that is further refined to soften and smooth the texture. The chocolate next undergoes the conching process where it is kneaded under heat in a large basin to develop the flavor, remove additional moisture and squeeze out more fat particles. The conching process may take several hours and up to a week depending on the quality of chocolate required. As a last step, vanillin or another flavor is added.
A tempering process involving further heating will also take place to stabilize the chocolate mass.

Back for round 3 in our “All About Chocolate” real soon…till then, Let them Eat Chocolate I Say!

P.S – Did you know that White Chocolate really isn’t chocolate? Anyone out there know what it really is and how it’s made?

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